BELIEFS OF LEARNERS AND TEACHERS IN CONTEXTS OF POVERTY REGARDING CURRICULUM-ALIGNED SCIENCE ELECTRONIC QUIZ ENGAGEMENT

Angela E. Stott

Abstract


Electronic quizzes have the potential to extend learning time and provide rapid, personalised feedback: features known to improve learning. However, information and communication technologies (ICTs), including electronic quizzes, tend to be under-utilised in education, particularly in contexts of poverty. The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) can predict ICT-uptake through measuring particular beliefs. However, little is known about such beliefs of learners, in poverty, related to software tailor-made for them. In this study, 71 grade 8 and 9 South African learners from poor rural communities, who had engaged with language-supportive curriculum-based Natural Sciences electronic quizzes over the previous three months, as well as three of their teachers, answered questionnaires designed, according to the TPB, to measure their beliefs regarding use of, and intention to continue using, this software. Positive attitudes were measured, particularly for use for revision. Support by the teacher, and the motivation of participation in an inter-school competition, were found to be important for motivating engagement. Access to computers was found to be largely gate-kept by the teachers, who perceived supervision of learners’ usage as a considerable sacrifice. From these findings suggestions are made for ICT-supported interventions with learners, particularly in contexts of poverty.

Keywords


Developing world education; e-Learning; Information and communication technologies (ICTs); language-supportive quizzes

Full Text:

PDF